Projects

One Tree Planted

Location: Peru

In January 2019, NextEnergy Foundation teamed up with One Tree Planted, a non-profit organisation on a mission to reforest our planet and provide education, awareness and engagement on the importance of trees and our ecosystem.

To date, One Tree Planted has planted almost 4.1 million trees, restoring 30,800 hectares of forest and rainforest across 18 countries. Reforestation only occurs in areas which have been degraded due to extensive farming and will thus immensely benefit from enriching the previously nutrient-depleted soil. Major social benefits arising from the organisation’s work include increasing education for local farmers and communities, paying particular attention to the inclusion and empowerment of female farmers and female-led cooperations.

In order to offset NextEnergy Capital’s CO2 emissions in 2018, the Foundation planted 12,000 trees in the Madre de Dios region of Peru. Home to over 10% of the world’s bird species, this has contributed to the restoration and protection of the “buffer zone” between Tambopata National Reserve, Bahuaja-Sonene National Park, and the city of Puerto Maldonado, a high-risk zone for deforestation and degradation due to unsustainable agricultural practices in the region. The project will work with local farmers and have additional benefits, such as establishing a sustainable agroforestry and enhancing the biodiversity in the local area.

Location: India

In January 2019, NextEnergy Foundation teamed up with One Tree Planted, a non-profit organisation on a mission to reforest our planet and provide education, awareness and engagement on the importance of trees and our ecosystem.

A year later, NextEnergy Foundation is pleased to announce that it is continuing its work with One Tree Planted by supporting three new projects.

Odisha, India – this project centres on alleviating the damage caused by Cyclone Fani and involves planting trees to restore the sustainable livelihoods of the small-holder farmers in the region.

 

Location: USA

In January 2019, NextEnergy Foundation teamed up with One Tree Planted, a non-profit organisation on a mission to reforest our planet and provide education, awareness and engagement on the importance of trees and our ecosystem.

A year later, NextEnergy Foundation is pleased to announce that it is continuing its work with One Tree Planted by supporting three new projects.

US Resident Orca – this project aims to rehabilitate salmon habitat which has been lost in the stretch of Pacific Ocean from Northern California to British Columbia, leading to diminishing West Coast Chinook salmon stocks and, in turn, affecting Orcas whose diet is almost entirely comprised of salmon. Read One Tree Planted’s blog story to find out more about how trees, salmon and Orca are all connected here.

https://onetreeplanted.org/blogs/stories/orcas-and-trees?_pos=2&_sid=a3fe263cf&_ss=r

Location: The Andes

In January 2019, NextEnergy Foundation teamed up with One Tree Planted, a non-profit organisation on a mission to reforest our planet and provide education, awareness and engagement on the importance of trees and our ecosystem.

A year later, NextEnergy Foundation is pleased to announce that it is continuing its work with One Tree Planted by supporting three new projects.

The Andes – this project aims to restore over 1 million hectares of high Andean mountain forest across 6 countries over the next 25 years. NextEnergy Foundation’s donation has contributed to the 175,000 trees which will be planted to achieve the project aim

April 2020 Update: The Andes Project has now been completed. 101 Acres of high-Andean land were restored and reforested across Ecuador and Peru using seedlings of Polylepis, Alnus and Buddleia trees. Independent assessments conducted of the Project by two global carbon companies confirm that Polylepis forests have a high value in carbon sequestration, and that they also capture and slow meltwater, thus preventing soil erosion. The restored land will also be critical for the survival of a number of endangered and threatened species listed on the IUCN’s Red List, including the Black-Breasted Puffleg Hummingbird and the Spectacled Bear. From a community perspective, much of the Project’s success is attributable to the incorporation of Incan traditions into the planting. Over 200 local volunteers helped to undertake the Project and they have been engaged as long-term Project leaders and stewards.